21 is your lucky number! 21 famous paintings for you to copy…

Here they are! All of these famous works can be copied using my tutorials.  Can you recognize them?  Just click the links listed in order below to find your favourite. Go ahead, have some fun painting.  You deserve it!

 

Emil Nolde “Windmill”

Franz Marc “Horse in Landscape”

Pablo Picasso “Le Rêve (The Dream)

Milton Avery “Seated Woman in Blue”

Gabrielle Munter “Yavlensky and Verevkin”

Gustav Klimt “Mother with Child”

Wassily Kandinsky “Houses in Munich”

Pablo Picasso “Girl with a Dove”

Vincent van Gogh “The Starry Night”

André Derain “Big Ben”

Gustav Klimt “The Kiss”

Alexj Jawlensky “Girl with Peonies”

Paul Klee “Chosen Site”

Toulouse Lautrec “In Bed the Kiss”

Edvard Munch “Madonna”

Henri Matisse “Basket with Oranges”

Edvard Munch “Girls on the Bridge”

Claude Monet “Les Nymphéas”

Egon Schiele “Ceramics”

Amadeo Modigliani “Woman with Black Cravat”

Friedensreich Hundertwasser “Man Find in Zahala” (cropped)

Original artwork by Christine Stoner ©
Interesting Instagram: christine_stoner21

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Copy Famous Paintings – Pablo Picasso

BBC_picasso

What is it?

Painting Child with a Dove, 1901 by Spanish artist, Pablo Picasso

How was it done?

Picasso painted this picture quickly with a few strong lines and bright spots of colour.  The forms are rendered in simple sweeping lines, there are three tones, light, mid and dark with greenish tones dominating.  The colours are subdued and controlled by swoops of line.  The picture is thickly painted with superfluous details left out.

This painting was done at the commencement of Picasso’s blue period when he painted in blue and green monochromatic colours only.

Why should we care?

The painting gives us an insight into the personality of Picasso at 21 when the portrait was done.  It shows his thoughtfulness and poetic sympathy with the subject.  At the time, Picasso was facing difficult years without a studio and he struggled to survive and sell his paintings. This was reflected in Picasso’s paintings of poverty and instability done around this time.  In the blue period, he often painted the desolation of social outsiders, prisoners, beggars, circus folk and despairing people.

Where can I find more paintings like this?

Picasso was influenced by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec and this can be seen in the portrait of Monsieur Boileau done in 1893.  Edgar Degas was another influence and his 1895 portrait of the Seated Woman reflects this.

Meditate, relax and enjoy

There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Take the luxury of “time out” to recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself, here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • a dark watercolour crayon
  • soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • an hour or two

Tips on the Process

  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • turn the original photo upside down to make the drawing
  • use a dark coloured water colour crayon for your drawing
  • correct drawing right-side up from the original
  • erase crayon easily with a damp cloth
  • it is okay for the watercolour crayon mark to bleed into the painting
  • everything is easily painted over with acrylics
  • paint in the background first
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • create a perfect skin tone by blending warm yellow, warm red, a dot of cool blue and lots of white, experiment first
  • layering colours on top of others using the scumbling technique creates magic
  • acrylics dry darker than the mixed colour

The Drawing Process

Turn your photo upside down and draw the space around the drawing first.  This is just a framework to place the figure on the page and you can easily correct right-side up with the dampened cloth as I have done below.

Otherwise, you may use my drawing below.  I suggest you ask your copy shop to print the PDF below onto a canvas and proceed to make your own unique painting.  Otherwise, you can print the copy on to good quality paper, paint the picture and frame it.  It’s your painting after all!

2908 2016 004

picasso-girl-w-dove

Image from http://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-22123607 accessed 18/08/2016

Cubism – The First Form of Abstract Art

 

demoiselles-d-avignon-mini

“Les Damioselles d’Avignon” 1907, Picasso  Accessed from Khan Academy on 14/10/2016

Cubism was the first form of abstract art and is rarely practiced by artists these days. The most famous Cubist work (above) is titled Les Damioselles d’Avignon (1907) by Picasso.  This painting was built up from cubes.  Picasso created this work to shock the art world and he certainly succeeded.

Here is another Cubist work by Marcel Duchamp and another fine example of Cubism.

duchamp-sonata

“Sonata”, 1911 by Marcel Duchamp Oil on canvas.  Image from Olga’s Gallery, accessed 16/10/2016.

I recently did a workshop on Cubism and will pass on the details here.  The first exercise was to do a Cubist sketch followed by a painting.

Firstly I drew an apple and divided it randomly with horizontal and oblique lines.  I then extended the edges to abstract the shape even further.   I then shaded in starting from the bottom and going around the apple.  The dark always touches the light and the light always touches the dark.

1501 002 1501 003 1501 005 1501 006 1501 008

To commence the painting I drew a still life with a paint brush and followed the same procedure as above.  The rule of thumb is that the objects must be either sitting separately or over-lapping, not touching.  Background lines are included and best done more sparingly to subtly delineate background from foreground.

1501 011 1401 011

I then proceeded to paint in the shapes being aware of the light which I placed on the left-hand side of the objects.  This required some time consuming blending.  For the best result it helps to use the paint directly from the tube without any water.

15011 001Cubism

Cubist works were often done in monochromatic tones. The fundamental qualities of Cubism are found in detachment and intellectual control, objectivity combined with intimacy, an interest in establishing a balance between representation and an abstract pictorial structure.

Here is a very powerful nude in the Cubist style by artist Corne Akkers from the Netherlands.

Corne Akkers

roundism

Corne has recently moved on to a new form of cubism with curved lines replacing the angular marks of Cubism.  This style is called Roundism.  Here Akkers combines crosshatching with Roundism.

Braque and Picasso were the founding fathers of cubist drawing.

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The Same Thing x Number of Times?

Man

“I am always saying to myself: that’s not right yet. You can do better, it’s rare when I
can prevent myself from taking a thing up again… x number of times, the same thing.
Sometimes, it becomes an absolute obsession. But for that matter, why would anyone
work, if not for that? To express the same thing, but express it better. It’s always
necessary to seek for perfection. Obviously for us this word no longer has the same meaning. To me, it means: From one canvas to the next, always go further, further…” Pablo Picasso

 

 

Courage – Daily Therapy for Artists

Josephine

“Success is dangerous.  One begins to copy oneself, and to copy oneself is more dangerous than to copy others.  It leads to sterility.” Picasso