Copy Famous Paintings – Claude Monet

Monets garden

Image accessed 4 December, 2017

What is it?

An oil painting, “Les Nymphéas” 1914-1926 by Claude Monet

How was this painting done?

This painting was done in an Impressionist technique using the “Alla Prima” style and with a chisel shaped brush. Monet painted the work all in one go, he did not wait for the paint to dry.   Monet used the “Le Petit Tache” method whereby the paint was not mixed on the palette. The artist dabbed different colours on the canvas. The colours blended with each other when looked at from a distance. It could be described as the “optical mixing of colour” and in this case, Monet has used ultramarine blue, lemon yellow, burnt sienna, cadmium red and titanium white.

This style was perfectly suited for Monet to literally shift the shimmers of his garden at Giverny.

Why should we care?

Impressionism was a real revolution in painting changing more in two decades than many artistic movements did in two centuries.

In 1872, in the French port city of Le Havre, 32-year-old Claude Monet made a painting that would give an art movement its name. Monet called his painting “Impression, Sunrise”. And an art movement was created.

The Impressionists broke all the formal academic rules — they used quick brush strokes, changed perspective and made their shadows out of colour, not black. Most of all the impressionists sought to capture light and most paintings, if not all, were done En plein air.  Scenes of ordinary life and glimpses of unpainted canvas were also characteristic of the Impressionist style.

Monet sometimes painted ten canvases of the same subject at the same time just to capture the subject in different light throughout the day.

Where can I find other paintings like it?

You will see typical subject matter, quick brush strokes, colourful shadows and glimpses of bare canvas as in French Impressionism in these examples.

Le Boulevard Montmarte at Night”, 1897 by Camille Pissarro

Mount Sainte-Victoire view from Lauves”,
1904-6, by Paul Cezanne

In a French Garden”, 1873 by Frederick Childe Hassam

Meditate, relax and enjoy

There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Take the luxury of “time out”, have fun and recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself, here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • an hour or two but don’t be concerned if  completing the painting over two days.

Tips on the Process

 

  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • paint in the background first
  • draw your painting with a small brush using a watery blend of blue.
  • everything is easily painted over with acrylics
  • The painting will not look great at the initial stages, stay with it for a pleasant surprise
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • layering colours on top of others using the scumbling technique creates magic
  • acrylics dry darker than the mixed colour

The Drawing Process

It is easy to copy from my drawing below using a fine brush.

Otherwise, you could ask your copy shop to print the PDF below onto a canvas and proceed to make your own unique painting.  Otherwise, you can print the copy on to good quality paper, paint the picture and frame it.  It’s your painting after all!

Monet Finished

Monets Garden

 

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Copy Famous Paintings – Edvard Munch

Edvard_Munch_-_Madonna_-_Google_Art_Project

Image from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madonna_(Munch_painting) accessed November, 2017

What is it?

Painting, “Madonna“, 1894 by Norwegian artist Edvard Munch

How was this painting done?

Softly undulating lines create a kind of cyclical form reminiscent of an aura around the figure. The painting was done in layers of oil paint.  The layers of paint show through to the final colours.  It seems Munch’s colours start with a background of gold and orange.  The artist appears to blend this with a raw umber or payne’s gray to create the darker tones in subsequent layers.

Why Should We Care?

Due to a childhood of illness and death in his family, Munch had a preoccupation with themes of anxiety, emotional suffering, and human vulnerability.  In his art he tried to explain life and its meaning not only to himself, but to others.   Edvard Munch tried to help others clarify their lives.  He was the first European artist to do this.

Where can I find other paintings like this?

Edvard Munch was influenced by Vincent Van Gogh and Paul Gauguin.  You can see this in Van Gogh’s “Girl in White” and Gauguin’s The Siesta

Meditate, relax and enjoy

There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Take the luxury of “time out” to recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself, here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • a dark watercolour crayon
  • soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • an hour or two

Tips on the Process

  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • turn the original photo upside down to make the drawing
  • use a dark coloured water colour crayon for your drawing
  • correct drawing right-side up from the original
  • erase crayon easily with a damp cloth
  • it is okay for the watercolour crayon mark to bleed into the painting
  • everything is easily painted over with acrylics
  • paint in the background first
  • The painting will not look great at the initial blocking in stage, stay with it for a pleasant surprise
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • create a perfect skin tone by blending warm yellow, warm red, a dot of cool blue and lots of white, experiment first
  • layering colours on top of others using the scumbling technique creates magic
  • acrylics dry darker than the mixed colour

The Drawing Process

Turn your photo upside down and draw the space around the drawing first.  This is just a framework to place the figure on the page and you can easily correct right-side up with the dampened cloth as I have done below.

Otherwise, you may use my drawing below.  I suggest you ask your copy shop to print the PDF below onto a canvas and proceed to make your own unique painting.  Otherwise, you can print the copy on to good quality paper, paint the picture and frame it.  It’s your painting after all!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copy Famous Paintings – Friedensreich Hundertwasser

hundertwasser-7

What is it?

This painting is a cropped piece of a larger work, Man find in Zahala”, 1975 by Austrian artist Friedensreich Hundertwasser

How was this painting done?

Man find in Zahala” was done in watercolour with spiral motifs, primitive forms, spectral colors, and repetitive patterns. Throughout his career Hundertwasser used the six spectral colors almost exclusively.  In this picture the forms are abstracted, simplified and embellished with colour.

Hundertwasser believed painting to be a religious experience.  It was his intention to offer his viewers a glimpse of paradise.  This painting is highly decorative as was typical of the style in Austria at the time.  .

Hundertwasser liked to be viewed as a “magician of vegetation” and he is true to form in this painting.

Why should we care?

We have to admire Hundertwasser for his unusual ability to turn his skills to many diverse projects.  He was multi-talented.  Not content to merely paint and make prints, he was also an architect without credentials who wrote manifestos, designed posters and stamps, and travelled the globe bringing construction projects to realization and collecting awards. He was also an outspoken proponent of many environmental and anti-nuclear causes. Hundertwasser is best known for his vibrantly-colored, opulently-decorated paintings, graphic works and contribution to printmaking techniques.

Where can I see other paintings like it?

Hundertwasser’s early paintings were heavily influenced by the Vienna Secession tradition of Egon Schiele and Gustav Klimt. His works from 1949 through to 1953 also display close affinity with well-known paintings by Paul Klee. “Small Rhythmic Landscape”, 1920 by Paul Klee has the same dreamlike landscape theme with similar primitive forms and repetitive patterns to those seen in Hundertwasser’s paintings.

Hundertwasser was good friends with and influenced by Rene (Bro) Brault.  Similarities in their work can be seen in Paysage Vallonn”, (date not found).  Brault’s palette was totally different from Hundertwasser’s  yet their treatment of trees was almost identical.

Meditate, relax and enjoy

Take the luxury of “time out” to recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself. There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size (recycled is okay as below)
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • a dark water soluble crayon
  • soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • two or three hours

Tips on the Process

  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • turn the original photo upside down to make the drawing
  • use a dark coloured water soluble crayon for your drawing
  • correct drawing right-side up from the original
  • erase crayon easily with a damp cloth
  • it is a big plus if the watercolour crayon mark bleeds into the painting
  • everything is easily painted over or blended in with acrylics
  • paint in the background first
  • The painting will not look great at the initial blocking in stage, stay with it for a pleasant surprise
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • acrylics dry darker than the colour you put down

The Drawing Process

Turn your photo upside down and draw the space around the drawing with the crayon first.  This is just a framework to place the figure on the page and you can easily correct right-side up with the dampened cloth as I have done below.

Otherwise, you may use my drawing below.  I suggest you ask your copy shop to print the PDF below onto a canvas and proceed to make your own unique painting.  Otherwise, you can print the copy onto good quality paper, paint the picture and frame it.

 Hundertwasser’s style is displayed perfectly in this short video.

Copy Famous Paintings – Emil Nolde

emil-nolde

What is it?

A painting titled Windmill”, 1924 by German artist, Emil Nolde

How was this painting done?

Nolde has gone out on a limb with this painting.  Most artists shy away from using black as it is sometimes believed to be a dead colour.  Green is also a difficult colour to mix and can so easily appear garish and take over a painting.

Here the artist has successfully used these two controversial colours.  The black is mixed with a very small amount of green to make a “living black”.  Nolde has mixed a tertiary green and toned it down by placing it directly beside its almost complementary colour, orange.  His placement of these two colours has created energy and vibrancy resulting in a painting that literally jumps off the canvas.

Nolde was a true artist who communicated immediately with his vision, his impulses and his influences. He gave this ordinary scene a disturbing presence.

Why should we care?

Nolde was one of the strongest and most independent of the German Expressionists and a member of the Dresden-based group known as Die Brücke. He was also a supporter of the Nazi party from the early 1920s, having become a member of its Danish section.

Adolf Hitler rejected all forms of modernism as “degenerate art“, and the Nazi regime officially condemned Nolde’s work. Until that time he had been held in great prestige in Germany. A total of 1,052 of Nolde’s paintings were removed from museums, more than those of any other artist. Some were included in the Degenerate Art exhibition of 1937, despite Nolde’s protests.

Nolde was not allowed to paint, even in private, after 1941.  As a matter of necessity, and in secret, he painted hundreds of watercolours in this time, which he hid.  Nolde called them the “Unpainted Pictures”.  The painter, although deprived of his livelihood as an artist, was loyal to the Nazi cause to the bitter end.  Nolde’s troubles, he claimed, were based on a “misunderstanding” and Hitler was simply misled by those around him in rejecting Nolde’s art.

Nolde was not only passionate about his painting, he was also loyal and forgiving, values we all aspire to today.

Where can I see other paintings like it?

Similarities can be seen inWindmill”, 1909 by Erich Heckel 

In this painting, fellow Die Brücke member, Heckel shows a similar use of colour although the brush strokes are much bolder and more like mark making.  Unlike Nolde, the artist has left areas of the canvas uncovered.   

And another expressionist work, “Spring Landscape at the Red House”, 1935 by Edvard Munch

In this landscape, Munch, like Nolde, has used intense colours, semi-abstraction and a mysterious, open-ended theme.

Meditate, relax and enjoy

Take the luxury of “time out” to recreate this fabulous painting in acrylics yourself. There can be no mistakes in making this painting.  Everything ends up as it should be.  Here’s how:

You will need

  • a small canvas, 30cm x 40cm is a good size (recycled is okay as below)
  • tubes of primary acrylic colours, blue, red and yellow plus white
  • a dark water soluble crayon
  • soft nylon paint brushes, (small, medium and a little larger)
  • water in an old container
  • a rag or disposable cloth
  • two or three hours

Tips on the Process

  • prime the canvas first, otherwise, just a wash and dry with a towel
  • print the photo you want to work from, measure and cut into quarters to make your drawing in a grid
  • turn the original photo upside down to make the drawing
  • use a dark coloured water soluble crayon for your drawing
  • correct drawing right-side up from the original
  • erase crayon easily with a damp cloth
  • it is a big plus if the watercolour crayon mark bleeds into the painting
  • everything is easily painted over or blended in with acrylics
  • paint in the background first
  • The painting will not look great at the initial blocking in stage, stay with it for a pleasant surprise
  • try not to use paint directly from the tube; experiment with how to mix colours
  • acrylics dry darker than the colour you put down

The Drawing Process

Turn your photo upside down and draw the space around the drawing with the crayon first.  This is just a framework to place the figure on the page and you can easily correct right-side up with the dampened cloth as I have done below.

Otherwise, you may use my drawing below.  I suggest you ask your copy shop to print the PDF below onto a canvas and proceed to make your own unique painting.  Otherwise, you can print the copy onto good quality paper, paint the picture and frame it.

 

0701-2017-005

0802 2017 001.JPG

IMG_0122

The original image is copyrighted and was accessed on 03/02/2017 from   http://www.the-athenaeum.org/art/detail.php?ID=104236  It is used here for educational purposes only.